Administrator

Administrator

Health & Safety (First Aid) Regulations 1981:

Employers Responsibility

The Health & Safety Law stipulated that an employer has a responsibility to ensure that first aid provision in the workplace is sufficient according to their risk assessment carried out.

 

This includes:

  • Completing a First Aid Risk Assessment to decide on where and how many First Aiders are needed.
  • Employers provide the training and refreshers training for those First Aiders.
  • Employers provide sufficient first aid kits and equipment.

 

Guidance and advice on the above can be sort form the following:

 

Risk Assessments

All employers must complete a first aid risk assessment which should include the following:

 

  • The nature of the work and workplace hazards and risks.
  • The size of the organisation.
  • The nature of the workforce.
  • The organisation history of accidents and lone workers.
  • The needs of travelling, remote and lone workers.
  • The work patterns shift patterns (rotas).
  • The distribution of the workforce.
  • The remoteness of the workplace from emergency medical services.
  • The employees working on shared or multi-occupied sites.
  • The annual leave along with other absences.
  • The first aid provision for non-employees.

 

Risk Assessment Tool:

 

First Aiders

There are a number of factors that need to be taken into consideration when advertising for staff to take on the role of company First Aider. Ideally the person who volunteers is best.

 

What skills should they have?

  • Attitude
  • Good communication skills
  • Commitment
  • Motivation
  • Reliable
  • God decision make
  • Able to learn new skills and develop knowledge
  • Able to absorb stress

 

First Aiders Information:

 

Courses

The Health & Safety Executive have introduced two new courses for the company first aiders.

  • HSE First Aid at Work (3 day course).
  • HSE EFAW Emergency First Aid at Work (one day course).

 

Annual refresher training

In October 2009 the HSE recommend that First Aiders attend annual refresher training. This is due to the strong evidence of ‘first aid skill fade’.

 

Reporting of Accidents

Accidents at work must be recorded in the accident book no matter what nature or severity. The incident may need to be reported directly to the Health & Safety Executive under RIDDOR 1995 regulations. It is the responsibility of the employer to report the following occurrences directly to the Health & Safety Executive:

  • Accidents resulting in 3 or more days off work (within 10 days).
  • Deaths (to be reported immediately).
  • Dangerous occurrences (to be reported immediately).
  • Diseases (report ASAP).
  • Major injuries (to be reported immediately).

 

Further Information:

 

Accident Book

Any accident at work, irrespective how small, MUST be recorded in the accident book. This book may be completed by any person on behalf of the patient. The information recorded can be useful in identifying accident trends and an area of concern that may need to be addressed and be reassessed i.e. risk assessment, not forgetting any insurance investigation.

 

  • Remember the Accident Book is a legal document.
  • Written evidence at the time is stronger evidence that you can recall from memory.
  • All sections should be completed and use black pen if possible (not pencil).
  • Remember the Data Protection Act; all personal details MUST be kept confidential and stored securely.
  • Nominate a person to be responsible for the safe keeping of these records. (I.E kept in a lockable cabinet).

 

Information required:

  • Name, address and occupation of the person involved in the accident.
  • Name, address, occupation and signature of the person completing the information.
  • Date, time and location of incident.
  • A description of how the accident occurred , giving the cause if possible.
  • Details of any injury sustained by the patient.

 

 http://books.hse.gov.uk/hse/public/saleproduct.jsf?catalogueCode=9780717626038

 

 
We hope you find this article useful. This is one in an alphabetical series of articles addressing various symptoms and their first aid treatments. If you would like more information on related resuscitation and first aid training, please get in touch.
 
You might also be interested in our blog. One of our more popular articles is about quality or quantity when it comes to first aid training.
 

You can also sign-up to our newsletter on our homepage.

 

 

First Response. Training for life. Training to save a life.

 

Tuesday, 6 March 2012

First Aid Kits

First Aid Kits:

Health & Safety (First Aid) Regulations 1981.

 

Description:

First Aid equipment should be suitable contained in a protective green box with a white cross. This makes it clearly identifiable and visible to all members of staff and first aiders.

 

BRITISH STANDARD 8599 - First Aid Kit Sizes and Contents (2010):

 

  • First Aid Manual
  • Sterile Medium Dressings (12cm x 12cm)
  • Sterile Large Dressing (18cm x 18cnm)
  • Triangular Bandage (single use 90cm x 90cm)
  • Sterile Eye Pad Dressing with Bandage
  • Washproof Assorted Plasters (Blue for food handlers)
  • Moist cleaning wipes
  • Microporous Tape
  • Nitrile Gloves
  • Finger Dressing with adhesive fixing (3.5cm)
  • Mouth-to-Mouth Resuscitation Device
  • Foil Blanket
  • Eye Wash
  • Burn Relief Dressing (10cm x 10cm)
  • Universal Shears
  • Conforming Bandage (7.5cm x 4cm)

 

Eye Wash:

Use mains water for eye irrigation if available, if not 1 litre of sterile water or ‘saline’ should be available in a seal container with a expiry date.

 

Travel First Aid Kits:

  • First Aid Manual
  • Washproof Assorted Plasters
  • Sterile Large Dressing (18cm x 18cnm)
  • Moist cleaning wipes
  • Microporous Tape
  • Nitrile Gloves
  • Triangular Bandage (single use 90cm x 90cm)
  • Small sterile eye wash (saline) 5ml
 
We hope you find this article useful. This is one in an alphabetical series of articles addressing various symptoms and their first aid treatments. If you would like more information on related resuscitation and first aid training, please get in touch.
 
You might also be interested in our blog about first aid medical team training for amatuer sports clubs.

 

You can also sign-up to our newsletter  on our homepage.

 

 

First Response. Training for life. Training to save a life.

 

Tuesday, 30 October 2012

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Thursday, 9 June 2011

Pilning Surgery Support Group

Pilning Surgery Support Group

Cive Haddrell, Direct at First Response Resuscitation and First AId Training Limited, Bristol was invited to give a talk to the Pilning Surgery Support Group. The turnout from the community of Pilning was overwhelming. During the evening and Clive presented the group with the New Resuscitation (2010) Guidelines as well as other First Aids topics.

Successfully passed QMS External Audit

First Response were delighted to announce their successful completion of an external audit for ISO9001, IS018001 and ISO14001.

Friday, 17 December 2010

Investors In People Review

Investors In People Review

First Response successfully passed the three yearly Investors In People review process carried out by 'Recognising Excellence South West'. We now look forward to the next three years developing its staff to meet with its customer's demands and expectations.

Tuesday, 8 May 2012

Fractures

Fractures:

Description:

A fracture may be defined as a break in the continuity of a bone, however a crack is also known as a fracture. Most human bones can stand up to fairly strong impacts or forces, however if the force is too strong or there is something wrong with the bone it will fracture. The older we get the less the force the bone can withstand. Children's bones are more elastic and have areas at the ends called growth plates which can sometimes be damaged so often their fractures are different to those seen in an adult.

 

A greenstick fracture is a common example of this wear the bone partly breaks but the rest bends because of its flexibility.

 

Causes:

  • Direct force.
  • Indirect force.
  • Twisting.
  • Violent sudden movement.
  • Pathological - an underlying illness or condition that has weakened the bone. EG Osteoporosis, a tumour or perhaps infection.

 

Types of Fracture:

  • Closed –The skin is not broken.
  • Open – The skin has been penetrated and the bone exposed to air.
  • Complicated - Involving trapped nerves or blood vessels.
  • Green Stick – More common in children, the bone is split.

 

Signs & Symptoms:

  • History.
  • Pain.
  • Loss of power.
  • Deformity, swelling, bruising at the site.
  • Difficulty in moving.
  • Shortening, rotation.
  • Irregularity.
  • Crepitus – a cracking or grating felling or sound.
  • Tenderness.

 

Diagnosis is made on circumstances, signs and symptoms and sometimes either an X-Ray, MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) or CT (Computed Tomography) scan.

 

Treatment:

  • Reassurance.
  • Do not move patient (unless in a dangerous situation like the middle of a road) and try to keep them still.
  • Make them comfortable.
  • Do not try to bandage or immobilize, wait for health care professional.

 

CAUTION:

  • Do not let the patient eat or drink in case surgery is required.

 

 

We hope you find this article useful. This is one in an alphabetical series of articles addressing various symptoms and their first aid treatments. If you would like more information on related resuscitation and first aid training, please get in touch.

 

You might also be interested in our blog. Amoungst other things, Clive Haddrell talks about what it is like being the paramedic consultant on the BBC's Casualty dramma.

 

 

You can also sign-up to our newsletter on our homepage.

 

 

First Response. Training for life. Training to save a life.

 

Tuesday, 8 May 2012

Febrile Convulsion

Febrile Convulsion:

Description:

Febrile convulsions or seizures are a relatively common childhood condition and although the cause is unknown they can occur when a child has a temperature 38 degrees C or above. This rise in temperature is partly due to the underdevelopment of the part of their brain which is responsible for temperature regulation. This rise in temperature can result can from infections of the throat, ear, and other infectious disease or overheating.

 

Watching a child or baby having a febrile convulsion can be extremely frightening for the parents. During this convulsion the child may stop breathing and lips may become blue. Most babies have what is called a tonic clonic seizure.

 

The cells in the brain communicate by using electrical impulses. A seizure occurs when these are disrupted causing the brain and body to behave abnormally.

 

Types:

Simple

  • The most common.
  • Is a tonic clonic seizure.
  • Last no longer than 15 minutes.
  • Does not reoccur over the following 24 hr.

 

Complex

  • Only has symptoms in one part of body.
  • Last longer than 15 minutes.
  • Child does not fully recover from seizure within 1 hr.
  • Has more seizures within 24 hrs.

 

Signs & Symptoms:

  • Obvious signs of fever, hot flushed skin.
  • Violent muscle twitching, clench fists, arched back.
  • Twitching of the face, squinting, fixed or upturned eyes
  • Breath-holding, drooling around the mouth.
  • Loss or partial loss of consciousness.

 

Treatment:

  • Position soft padding/pillows around the child .
  • Remove clothing, bedding.
  • Ensure a good supply of cool, fresh air. (be careful not to overcool the child).
  • Sponge child's skin with tepid water to help cooling.
  • If fits persist Dial 999.

 

CAUTION:

  • Never place anything in child's mouth.
  • Do not try and restrain the child.
  • Be careful not to overcool.

 

We hope you find this article useful. This is one in an alphabetical series of articles addressing various symptoms and their first aid treatments. If you would like more information on related resuscitation and first aid training, please get in touch.

 

You might also be interested in our blog. In this post, Linda Hart talks about seizures and related first aid.

 

 

You can also sign-up to our newsletter on our homepage.

 

 

First Response. Training for life. Training to save a life.

 

Tuesday, 8 May 2012

Fainting or Syncope

Fainting or Syncope:

Description:

In order for the brain to function properly it relies on oxygen being carried to the blood. If the blood flow is reduced temporarily then the brains defence mechanism kicks in and takes available blood and oxygen from other parts of the body at the expense of other organs.

 

Breathing rate increases (hyperventilation) as does the heart rate as it tries to pump blood around the body. This increased heart rate lowers the blood pressure (hypotension); the combination of both can lead to temporarily loss of consciousness but at the least can make a patient fell cold, sweaty and dizzy. The onset is usually sudden and other symptoms may include blurred vision.

 

Causes:

Postural Syncope:

Occasionally from sitting but usually whilst standing for prolonged periods or when getting up. The blood pools in the big veins in the lower limbs and it is more difficult to get it back to the heart.

 

Vasovagal:

  • Reaction to pain.
  • Emotional stress or fright.
  • Hot stuffy environments.

 

Situational Syncope:

Occurs when a bodily function or activity places a sudden strain on the autonomic nervous system:

  • Coughing
  • Sneezing
  • Swallowing
  • Laughing
  • Passing stools
  • Exercising

 

Carotid Sinus Syndrome:

The carotid sinus as part of the carotid artery is located in the neck and is the main artery to the brain. Physical stimulation can affect the carotid sinus such as:

  • Turning the head to one side.
  • Wearing a tight collar.
  • Sometimes shaving in the area of the carotid sinus.

 

Cardiac Origin:

Transient decreases in the cardiac output as a result of severe bradycardia (slow pulse) which reduces cardiac output or a tachycardia (fast pulse)

 

Signs & Symptoms:

During fainting, one or more of the following signs may be present:

  • Slow pulse increasing with recovery.
  • Cold, clammy skin.
  • Pale in colour.
  • Reduce level of consciousness (AVPU).

 

Treatment:

  • Loosen any tight clothing.
  • Lie the patient down on the floor before they fall.
  • Raise their legs (raises blood pressure by easing the flow of blood from the major vessels in the lower legs to the heart.
  • Patient quick to recover however let the patient stay until they feel they are able to sit up slowly. If they then still feel faint lie them back down.
  • Ask the patient if this is their first faint (fainting is rare) if however they are having repeated episodes of fainting advise visit to GP.

 

CAUTION:

  • If the patient does not regain consciousness quickly, open airway and check for normal breathing. If patient is breathing normally, place them in the recovery position with a good airway. Then dial 999.
  • If the patient is not breathing normally or in doubt dial 999.

 

 

We hope you find this article useful. This is one in an alphabetical series of articles addressing various symptoms and their first aid treatments. If you would like more information on related resuscitation and first aid training, please get in touch.

 

You might also be interested in our blog. One of our more popular articles is about how we should control bleeding.

 

You can also sign-up to our newsletter on the homepage.

 

 

First Response. Training for life. Training to save a life.

 

 

Tuesday, 8 May 2012

Eye injuries

Eye Injuries:

Description:

The structure of the face helps to protect the eyes from injury. Each eyeball is set into a protective socket of bone known as the orbit, and the eyelids can close very quickly to form a protective barrier. However the eye can still be injured as a result of a direct blow, metal, grit, fluids, chemicals or dust particles.

 

Although uncommon, all eye injuries are potentially serious due to the possibility of damaging the patient's vision. Even superficial grazes to the cornea of the eye can lead to infection and subsequently permanent damage. An eye injury is classified as superficial (i.e. affecting only the surface) if it does not penetrate beneath the Bowmans Membrane (a smooth layer located in the cornea).

 

Signs & Symptoms:

  • Intense pain within or near the eyelids.
  • Visible wound (bruising or bloodshot appearance).
  • Partial or total loss of vision.
  • Blood around the eye or within the eye.

 

Treatment:

  • Wash small pieces of dirt, grit or dust out of the eye with cold tap water or sterile eye wash.
  • Encourage the patient to keep still with a soft sterile pad/dressing over the injured eye.
  • Encourage the patient to close their good eye as this will help stop movement in the injured eye.
  • If necessary dress both eyes. Please be aware this could prove distressing for the patient so keep talking to them.
  • In the case of a chemical getting in the eye, wear cloves and wash with lots of clean water ensuring water runs away from the good eye. Firmly open the patients eyelid to irrigate the eye fully.

 

CAUTION

  • DO NOT attempt to remove an embedded foreign object from the patients eye.

 

 

We hope you find this article useful. This is one in an alphabetical series of articles addressing various symptoms and their first aid treatments. If you would like more information on related resuscitation and first aid training, please get in touch.

 

You might also be interested in our blog. Tim Hart talks about dealing with a diabetic hypo when someone might be drunk.

 

You can also sign-up to our newsletter on our homepage.

 

 

First Response. Training for life. Training to save a life.

First Response Resuscitation & First Aid Training Ltd

9 Counterpool Road, Kingswood, Bristol BS15 8DQ

Tel: 0117 949 0944

 

  

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